Thoughts on writing code inside of VR?

Discussion in 'VR Chat and News' started by Harry_T, Sep 16, 2016.

  1. Harry_T

    Harry_T Community Manager Staff Member

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  2. Ryan

    Ryan Moderator Staff Member

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    I'd be curious to see how long it takes them to write anything of substance with this method as apposed to just using a keyboard. They'll say that testing is going to be much faster but honestly, how long does it take to hit a play button, stand up, put on the headset and test? So you're probably going to say 15 seconds or so of not having to do that anymore.. Makes for cool videos and demos though :)
     
  3. JFalcon

    JFalcon Member

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    Oddly enough, I work with a group of programmers who never learned how to "touch-type" and apparently are even less inclined to "point and click". I never understood how a coder could actually call themselves one without knowing how to use a keyboard and not knowing all the keys on them. It's funny when people walk up to my desk and start to ask me a question while I'm still typing on my keyboard, it's not really multi-tasking and I really dislike interruptions, because it takes so long to regain context.
     
  4. Ryan

    Ryan Moderator Staff Member

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    Jesus, how old are these guys? Who would turn down the opportunity to be able to do their job 10 times faster with minimal effort? I mean it's like turning down a super power with zero downsides. People are strange (and not just when you're a stranger)
     
  5. JFalcon

    JFalcon Member

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    Since you opened those Doors <grin> but it seems like a lot of new developers just "learn on the job" or "hunt and peck" on the keyboard. One of our former "architects" came over to write code using my keyboard and couldn't find the 'a', 's', 'd', 'e' or 'c' keys because I had worn the letters off them. I said, "just put your fingers on the keyboard and type!"

    To be honest, I don't know how any self-respecting computer programmer would not learn how to touch-type, when I was in High School, I was doing 34 words per minute until the teacher came along and saw me doing two fingers typing. After she caught me, (thank the gods) it slowed down to about 8 words per minute. However, I persisted and I learned. Two finger typing sucks in comparison to being able to use all digits.
     
  6. Kolsulfr

    Kolsulfr New Member

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    Seems like it could be useful as a visual aid, similar to writing things out on a whiteboard. I'd be curious to see how it works in practice though but it'd definitely be interesting to play with.

    @JFalcon Jesus, I've been hesitant to go for a programming job because there's no way I'd be able to sell myself right until I'm confident I understand every in and out of everything on such a level where I can manipulate the computer completely. It always baffles me to hear about people going into those positions without having such basic things covered. Hell my dad is a sysadmin for United Launch Alliance and it's the first place he's worked for that he hasn't talked about people just being thrown into the job with little to no prior knowledge. Apparently launching rockets is what it takes for that not to happen.
     
  7. JFalcon

    JFalcon Member

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    Sometimes people learn by doing, it's understandable. However, I wouldn't want to be touched by a brain surgeon getting some "hands-on" experience. You can't wait until you know everything inside and out either or you'll never get real world experience. I think my philosophy is kind of like, learn the basics as best as you can enjoy what you do in life and learn how to make things better at what you do. I tend to believe that a person who truly loves their job never feels like they are actually doing work.

    I kind of have a love-hate relation with my job. I love it because it keeps me off the streets at night and keeps my mind sharp, I hate it because I think they take advantage of me sometimes. When I can inspire the oldest person in the room to learn something new, then I know I did a good job.

    If you really want to get into programming, there is an old saying, "eat your own dog food". You can download so many free tools these days, it hurts. Blender for the artist, Audacity for the sound mixer, Unity for the game maker, Visual Studio 2017 Community Edition. They're all out there waiting to unlock that creative genius and get you hooked. Create a home Web page, make a game you like to play, dabble in some code, just write it for you.

    Don't stifle your potential and don't believe you cannot create something amazing that others' would enjoy seeing one day.
     
  8. Kolsulfr

    Kolsulfr New Member

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    Yeah, regardless of current ability there's definitely a point where you just have to jump on it and get that hands on experience. Furthermore doing the job and effectively navigating the accompanying workspace are in themselves two separate things.

    That's definitely been my approach to learning, though I find I become so completely obsessed and my simple for- fun project turns into something massive so quickly I haven't yet been able to balance it out with say, working a job effectively without every last bit of brainspace being completely devoted to the project with none left for anything else. I've actually been saving for the past year or so to do some extended traveling where I can completely devote to letting myself obsess and go at it 12-16 hours a day for a while. If nothing else it should get me to a point where I can say I have a reasonably compitent grasp of the basics.
     
  9. JFalcon

    JFalcon Member

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    I know exactly how you feel and I wish I could say there was a remedy for it, but if you're in love with what you do, it's just that.
     
  10. Ryan

    Ryan Moderator Staff Member

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    Udemy or Coursera probably have some amazing courses on learning to code. Unity would be an easier place to start as it's scripting and not full on C++ like UE4
     

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